The Top 4 Health Benefits of Krill Oil

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Antarctic krill oil is a rich source of essential nutrients that support a number of potential health benefits. Studies show krill oil can assist in supporting the health of your mind, heart, bones and more. Read on to learn more about the top four ways krill oil can support your whole-body health.*

Cardiovascular Health

Like fish oil, krill oil contains fatty acids that support cardio health and promote healthy circulation. The western diet and many other westernized diets dramatically increase the need for a higher ingestion of long chain Omega-3. It’s important we consume this vital nutrient as part of our diet, through both food and supplementation. The NKO® patented extraction process amplifies Omega-3 health-promoting qualities through enhanced digestibility and absorption. This makes it a perfect alternative if your diet runs low on natural Omega-3 sources.*

 

Krill oil is rich in a novel form of Omega-3, particularly polyunsaturated EPA and DHA, which are known help to maintain healthy cholesterol levels already in the normal range. Heart muscle cells also utilize these good fats in their daily healthy function. Krill oil is a source of the super antioxidant astaxanthin, which also supports cardiovascular health.*

Joint Health

Maintaining a healthy balance between Omega-3 and Omega-6 is important for optimal health. While both of these fatty acids play a positive role in whole body health, the American diet tends to provide much more Omega-6 than Omega-3. This can lead to mild imbalances that set the stage for joint health challenges.*

 

Supplementing with a highly digestible Omega-3, like krill oil, can help maintain Omega-6:Omega-3 balance. This, in turn, provides powerful support for joint comfort and range of motion. NKO® has been found to help maintain normal levels of plasma C-reactive protein (a key marker of both joint and heart health).*1

Brain Health

Normal cognitive function is supported by Omega-3 and phospholipids, which are vital nutrients found in krill oil. Many studies across various populations show that Omega-3 EPA and DHA help support memory, mood and attention. Omega-3 helps the brain to function optimally and is equally important for adults, children and infants.*

 

Regarded as the fattest organ in the human body, the brain may consist of at least 60 percent fat, with DHA being the most abundant fatty acid. DHA plays a key structural and functional role for brain health, and its levels naturally decline during the aging process. Supplementing with Omega-3 DHA maintain brain health and sharp, mental acuity.*

Women’s Health

Menstrual health encompasses diverse body systems including hormonal balance, mood and energy patterns, and physiological symptoms. Most women experience several natural symptoms just a few days before their menstrual cycles begin. Shifts in estrogen and progesterone balance can result in moodiness, bloating, breast tenderness and compromised stress response.

 

Krill oil, which contains phospholipids that are known to support healthy hormone production, can support a balanced menstrual cycle. In a randomized, double-blind clinical study, NKO® was found to be superior to fish oil in balancing the common, natural symptoms associated with the menstrual cycle, such as breast tenderness, stress and irritability.*2

 

 

About the Author

Serving as Sales Director, Jacqueline Khayat’s role includes expanding distribution for Neptune’s line of products and ingredients. Jackie has extensive and relevant education, earning a Bachelor of Science in Nutrition from Montreal University and obtaining a Graduate Degree in Business and Management from renowned HEC Montreal. As a Dietitian, she taps into her extensive knowledge of nutrition to help educate the market about omega-3 krill oil benefits and our line of products including OCEANO3: Neptune’s consumer branded krill oil, exclusively offered through its website oceano3.com in Canada and the US.

 

 

1 Deutsch, L. J Am Coll Nutr 2007; 26(1): 39-48.

2 Sampalis, F., et al. Altern Med Rev 2003; 8(2): 171-179.